State of Kentucky Archives: on Principles & Values


C. Wesley Morgan: Freedom of Faith, Family and Country

Q: Do you promise to protect the freedom of Christians to share the Gospel and to practice Biblical principles?

A: Yes.

Q: What does "separation of church and state" mean to you?

A: The government will not create a religious state. But the constitution prohibits the government from restricting the free exercise of a religion.

Q: Is there anything else you would like voters to know about you?

A: Faith, Family and Country: I believe we as American's should be:

  1. Free to worship JESUS CHRIST without persecution; Free to protect the life of the unborn and express your view that abortion is morally wrong
  2. FAMILY: Free to educate your children without government indoctrination; Free to enjoy the fruits of your labor without being taxed to death.
  3. Country: Free to choose your representatives without them being hand picked by party elites; Free to have a news media that does not promote untruths through propaganda.
Source: AFA iVoterGuide on 2020 Kentucky Senate race Nov 3, 2020

Steven Cox: Criminalize pork-barrel bills

Clean Legislation: Pork-barrel bills must be criminalized. New laws should do what they're intended to do, not give kickbacks to special interests or push through bad legislation that couldn't pass on its own.
Source: 2020 Kentucky Senate website CoxForUS.com Feb 6, 2020

Andy Beshear: With great power comes great responsibility

We are each here blessed to be able to serve. But that comes with a special responsibility. That responsibility has been laid out everywhere from the bible to pop culture. Luke 12:48 it states: "For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required," Similarly, the wisdom from Uncle Ben that launched a superhero franchise is "With great power comes great responsibility." And the power to govern, to change laws and to change lives, is a great power, which comes with great responsibility.
Source: 2020 Kentucky State of the State address Jan 14, 2020

Steven Cox: Socially progressive, fiscally conservative

I consider myself socially progressive and fiscally conservative. I am mainly a Democrat because I believe in the idea that America belongs to the people that are creating it, not to the people who have the most money. When I say I am fiscally conservative, it means that I believe in growth, but I believe in sustainable growth. Something that we can continually do and fuel, so we can continually grow and succeed as a society.
Source: The Student Post on 2020 Kentucky Senate race Jun 23, 2019

Wesley Morgan: 100 % Trump supporter: "I'm so anti-Democrat"

"I'm so anti-Democrat," he said, calling himself a "100 percent Trump supporter, a conservative Republican."
Source: Lexington Herald-Leader on 2020 Kentucky Senate race May 29, 2019

Robert Goforth: Self-description: Christian; father; veteran; conservative

Christian. Husband. Father. Veteran. Pharmacist. Business Owner. Farmer. State Representative. Conservative. These are some of the words that describe Dr. Robert Goforth.

Robert is running for Kentucky's Governor because he wants to give back to the state and the people that helped him to succeed in life.

Robert grew up in poverty, enlisted in the U.S. Army when he became of age, and served as a combat engineer. Robert put himself through college at the University of Kentucky, and graduated from pharmacy school, becoming a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.).

Robert is committed to a people-first agenda that values working families, small business owners, and seniors.

Source: 2019 Kentucky governor campaign website GoforthForKY.com Dec 31, 2018

Andy Beshear: Kickback investigation resulted in deputy's resignation

One of Beshear's first important decisions after winning election as attorney general was to appoint Tim Longmeyer as his chief deputy. Longmeyer resigned within three months after being caught in a federal investigation of a kickback scheme he ran while he served as a top member of Gov. Steve Beshear's administration. Federal authorities have said they received no evidence that either Andy Beshear or Steve Beshear were aware of the investigation.

Andy Beshear will argue he has fought to help needy Kentuckians in many ways, stressing his efforts to combat the opioid epidemic that includes lawsuits against opioid manufacturers and creation of an opioid disposal program. He'll also talk a lot about what he is mostly known for--filing court actions against what he says have been illegal actions of a Republican governor and General Assembly.

Source: Louisville Courier-Journal on 2019 Kentucky governor's race Jul 9, 2018

Wesley Morgan: Supported Democrat after 2018 primary loss

Morgan, who lost to a primary challenger night, says his defeat was orchestrated by Republican leaders in the state. In a fiery Facebook post, Morgan said he will support the Democratic candidate for his House seat in District 81, rather than his Republican opponent, and that he will be a thorn in the side to Republicans who support "corrupt individuals."

"Tonight the GOP lost a true conservative and patriot," he wrote. "I will no longer be associated with the Republican Party."

Source: The Louisville Courier-Journal on 2020 Kentucky Senate race May 23, 2018

Alison Grimes: Father indicted for illegal campaign contributions to Alison

Longtime Kentucky Democratic operative Jerry Lundergan was indicted by a federal grand jury for allegedly making illegal contributions to the 2014 U.S. Senate campaign of Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes and then conspiring to cover them up. Lundergan was indicted on 10 counts after investigators found they "willingly and knowingly" made illegal corporate contributions to Grimes' campaign.

The indictment alleges that Lundergan told campaign consultants to bill S.R. Holding Co. for work they did for his daughter's campaign. The company paid those bills and then allegedly did not seek reimbursement from Grimes' campaign. The payments referenced in the indictment totaled $194,270.39.

Lundergan's attorney denied the allegations against his client. "The coordinated campaign efforts raised more than $25 million. The campaign didn't need or seek any extra help from Jerry Lundergan or his family-run business."

Source: Lexington Herald-Leader on 2019 Kentucky gubernatorial race May 21, 2018

Scott Walker: Pray for Kentucky, that we will be blessed

I want you to know that I pray for you. I pray earnestly for you. I pray individually for you. I pray for you as a group. I pray for the people of Kentucky. I pray for the Commonwealth that we will be blessed, that we will be preserved from so much that has potential to harm us. I'm a person who believes in the power of prayer, and I want each and every one of you to know that I pray for you.
Source: 2018 Kentucky State of the State address Jan 16, 2018

Wesley Morgan: Filed bill making it harder to remove Confederate statues

When Lexington removed two statues of Confederate generals from its former county courthouse, Morgan said he got "sick to my stomach."

"It's just not right," said the lawmaker. "I'm a strong believer that if you fail to recognize history, you are doomed to repeat it." Morgan has filed legislation to make it harder to remove and relocate Confederate statues in the state.

Source: Lexington Herald-Leader on 2020 Kentucky Senate race Jan 12, 2018

James Comer: I believe that public servants should put God above all else

Q: Briefly describe your spiritual beliefs and values.

Comer: I am a God fearing, born again Christian. I believe that public servants should put God above all else. I believe that the US was founded by Christians with the belief that we are one nation under God. I do believe that our religious liberties are under attack from liberals in Washington and the left wing media trying to be "politically correct." I am a leader who will fight to restore our religious liberties, put prayer back into public education and government offices, and vote to protect and preserve Life and end federal funding of abortions.

Q: What in the nature of mankind caused America's Founders to carefully define, separate, and limit powers in the Constitution?

Comer: To prevent concentration of powers and to prevent any one branch from becoming too powerful. That is why there are checks and balances in the Constitution.

Source: 2016 AFA Action iVoterGuide on Kentucky House race Nov 8, 2016

James Comer: I am a social conservative

Q: Considering all issues (social, economic, national security, etc.), which political philosophy best describes you?

Comer: Very Conservative

Q: Please defend your answer to the previous question by referencing your publicly available track record.

Comer: I have a public record which shows that I am a social conservative. I co-sponsored the KY Legislation which amended the KY Constitution to define marriage as only between one man and one woman, and I always voted pro-Life 100% of the time as a six term KY State Legislator. As Commissioner of Agriculture, I significantly downsized my number of employees and always returned money back to the taxpayers. I remain the only statewide officeholder in the history of KY to return an earmark back to the taxpayers. That earmark totaled $1,650,000!

Source: 2016 AFA Action iVoterGuide on Kentucky House race Nov 8, 2016

Matt Bevin: Led public Pledge of Allegiance, & speeches about patriotism

The most absurd turn of the day may have been what Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin did with his time to speak. Where I've seen Bevin give some very eloquent speeches about patriotism, I didn't see that Bevin Saturday.

Instead of giving any of his solid plans for the commonwealth, Bevin asked the crowd to join him in the Pledge of Allegiance. Before he finished jumping between his speech themes, he had used up his time and was cut off by the Fancy Farm music.

Source: Frankfort State-Journal on 2015 Kentucky Gubernatorial race Aug 3, 2015

Matt Bevin: Don't celebrate partisanship; call for unity instead

In a sharp departure from the theme of the picnic, Bevin said he was glad to be at the event, which primarily serves as a fundraiser for St. Jerome's Parrish, but said that the people there "literally are celebrating the very worst elements of the political process."

"We are celebrating our divisions, and we are doing it in a childish way that frankly does not resolve any of the issues that we face," Bevin said. To the surprise of the crowd, Bevin asked the crowd to join him in the Pledge of Allegiance before devoting his speech to a denunciation of partisanship and a call to heed the Kentucky state motto, "United we stand, divided we fall."

The more Bevin called for unity--bypassing attempts at humor altogether--the more the boos from the Democratic side of the pavilion intensified, until the University of Kentucky Wildcats fight song came on and Bevin's microphone cut out, signifying that his allotted time had lapsed.

Source: Lexington Herald-Leader on 2015 Kentucky Gubernatorial race Aug 1, 2015

Rand Paul: Under KY law,can't run for Senate & President on same ballot

Kentucky law dictates that "no candidate's name shall appear on any ballot more than once." In other words, Paul wouldn't be able to compete in both his home state's GOP presidential primary and Republican Senate primary, which will be held on the same day in May 2016.

So, game over then? Hardly. Paul's best-case scenario appears to be convincing the Kentucky Republican Party to abandon its current May 2016 primary: the state party could instead award delegates through a new presidential caucus that would be held in March 2016. But Paul would find himself back in the same double-listing pickle come November 2016 if he were to win the GOP's presidential nomination. That, of course, would be a problem Paul would love to have.

Even if all else fails, Paul could simply sit out his home state's presidential primary. The Kentucky law prevents a candidate from being listed on the same state ballot twice, but it doesn't bar a candidate from competing in contests in the rest of the country.

Source: Slate.com coverage of 2016 Kentucky Senate race Feb 18, 2015

Alison Grimes: One of us represents Washington; one of us represents KY

Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes used her speech at Kentucky's Fancy Farm picnic Saturday to argue that "Mitch McConnell doesn't care." Her face reddened as she yelled into the microphone over boosters and booers, claiming at various points that the Republican senator doesn't care about working people, seniors, women, students, unions and coal miners. "One of us represents the Washington establishment; one of us represents Kentucky," Grimes said. "One of us represents the past; one of us represents the future."

The minority leader used his speech to nationalize the race and paint Grimes as a tool of national Democrats. McConnell said, "There's only one way to change America in 2014. That's to change the Senate and make me the leader of a new majority--to take America in a different direction." McConnell repeatedly compared Grimes to President Obama.

Source: Politico.com weblog on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Aug 1, 2014

Alison Grimes: AdWatch: Grimes' opponent offered deal to drop out

The Senate campaign of Alison Lundergan Grimes denied allegations made by a former Democratic rival who said he was offered money by the Grimes campaign to drop out of the race. Ed Marksberry, a former Democratic Senate candidate, sent a 15-page letter to the blog PageOneKentucky.com alleging that an unnamed representative from the Grimes campaign offered to pay off his campaign debt and hire his campaign manager if he would drop out of the race. "That did not happen," a Grimes spokeswoman said. "We appreciate Ed's support and wish him the best."

In his letter, Marksberry said an unnamed person close to Jerry Lundergan, the candidate's father and a former Kentucky Democratic Party chairman, approached him about dropping out of the race. "They said that Jerry really liked me, and that Jerry takes care of his friends," Marksberry wrote. "And if Alison wins, there could be a favor owed to me." Marksberry wrote of his desire to see Grimes beat Mitch McConnell, so he proposed a deal, which fell through

Source: Lexington Herald Leader AdWatch on 2014 Kentucky Senate race Jan 7, 2014

Steve Beshear: Focus on helping people instead of on keeping power

In the last few years, the tone of discourse in this country has grown louder, uglier and more hateful. In Washington, you find leaders focused on keeping power, not helping people. They point fingers instead of reaching across the aisle. They tear down instead of building up. And they preach intolerance instead of inclusion. That's why we have government shutdowns, filibusters, continuation budgets and a myriad other examples of counter-productive gamesmanship.

And out here in the rest of the country, too often office holders and voters have let themselves get caught up in this "take no prisoners" approach to politics. We're losing the ability to listen; we're losing the ability to treat each other's opinions with respect and to overcome differences. We must resolve not to let that happen here in Kentucky. We must remember that we are Kentuckians first and Democrats and Republicans second.

Source: 2014 Kentucky State of the State speech Jan 7, 2014

Alison Grimes: Fight "Senator Gridlock": Kentucky pays for GOP dysfunction

Alison Grimes' campaign has waged a news-release campaign against McConnell since the partial government shutdown began, accusing him daily of being responsible for the shutdown and labeling him "Senator Gridlock."

McConnell said that his high-profile part in the deal that ended the shutdown and extended the debt ceiling had taken the air out of Grimes' message. "It steps on the whole narrative of her campaign," McConnell said.

The Grimes campaign fired back with a release that McConnell was still "Senator Gridlock," noting a number of past remarks McConnell has made proudly proclaiming himself a "guardian of gridlock." A Grimes spokesperson said, "It is an embarrassment that McConnell waited until the 11th hour to stop the manufactured crisis that he and members of Congress created. It is not heroic for McConnell to do his job and reopen the government. Kentuckians now have to pay for McConnell's Washington dysfunction."

Source: Lexington Herald Leader on 2014 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 17, 2013

Jack Conway: TV ad: Rand Paul made fun of Christianity and Christ

Q: Here's the controversial ad about Conway's opponent:
Q: The woman in question said the ad is accurate, but "over the top." [To Conway]: Do you believe he's a Christian?

CONWAY: I'm not questioning his faith. I'm questioning his actions. Baylor University banned this group because they were "making fun of Christianity and Christ." And we're asking, is it appropriate, whether you're 22 years old or 42 years old, to ever tie up a woman and ask her to kneel before a false idol?

Source: CNN "360 Degrees" coverage: 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 19, 2010

Jack Conway: FactCheck: "Aqua Buddha" TV ad is accurate but over the top

Q: [On your TV ad claiming that Paul kidnapped a fellow student]: This was nearly 30 years ago, and this was some sort of satirical group that clearly were collegiate level humor. But are you implying that he's kidnapping people? Are you implying that it's somehow criminal?

CONWAY: No, I'm not implying criminal. And the woman came out again today, and she said our ad was correct.

Q: Well, she said your ad was over the top.

CONWAY: And FactCheck.org said our ad was correct.

Q: Accurate, but over the top. But does an incident that may or may not have occurred 27 years ago, does it really matter to voters today, given all the things that people are facing, all the things, the problems that people are having in their own lives?

Q: Doesn't everybody do stupid stuff in college or when they're in late teens, early 20s?

CONWAY: Sure, sure, everyone does stupid stuff. But Rand Paul is denying that this happened.

Source: CNN "360 Degrees" coverage: 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 19, 2010

Jack Conway: TV ad: Accuser is anonymous, but a Mr. Green says it's true

Q: [With regard to Conway's "Aqua Buddha" TV ads, which claim that Rand Paul kidnapped a fellow college student]: What's the name of the woman who made these allegations?

CONWAY: Well, the woman who has made the allegations has remained anonymous.

Q: So, you don't know, really, who she is, other than one or two reporters who have talked to her?

CONWAY: Other than the reporters for "The Washington Post" and "GQ" and the other reporters. One gentleman named Mr. Green has gone on record who was a compatriot of Rand Paul's in this secret society and said, yes, they aspired to sacrilege and Rand Paul reveled in it.

Q: But does it concern you to be basing so much of your campaign on a nameless person who won't come forward? You're an attorney. You couldn't put this person on a stand. You couldn't put these statements in court.

CONWAY: Look, she has called it sadistic and she has called it weird. And she's talked about it on multiple occasions. The president of Baylor banned the group.

Source: CNN "360 Degrees" coverage: 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 19, 2010

Jack Conway: Claims Rand Paul worships "Aqua Buddha" & mocks Holy Bible

"Why was Rand Paul a member of a secret society that called the Holy Bible 'a hoax,' that was banned for mocking Christianity and Christ?" Conway's campaign asks in a new statewide ad. "Why did Rand Paul once tie a woman up, tell her to bow down before a false idol and say his god was Aqua Buddha?"

The latter claim refers to a charge made in a GQ article by an unnamed college swim teammate, who said Paul and another student also tried to force her to smoke marijuana. The episode reportedly occurred in 1983. Paul has called the claim "ridiculous" and said he was "never involved with kidnapping."

During the debate, Conway repeated the allegation--triggering Paul's response: "Jack, you know how we tell when you're lying? It's when your lips are moving, Paul sputtered. "You're going to stand over there and accuse me of a crime for 30 years ago from some anonymous source?"

Paul describes himself as a "pro-life Christian" and says his faith is "something very personal to me, my wife, my kids."

Source: National Post coverage of 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 18, 2010

Rand Paul: Accused of belonging to secret society NoZe Brotherhood

Paul is threatening to withdraw from a final meeting with Jack Conway unless he pulls an incendiary TV ad, which claims Paul once tied up a woman and forced her to worship before a false idol. "I'm not sure I'll appear in public with someone who is going to question my religion," Paul said.

Paul's threat to cancel the Oct. 25 debate with Conway follows the re-emergence of embarrassing allegations about Paul while he was a student at Baylor University in the 1980s. According to an article published last summer in GQ magazine, Paul belonged to the NoZe Brotherhood, a secret society that had been banned on the Texas university's campus because it mocked Christianity and the Baptist faith. Baylor is a Baptist school.

"Why was Rand Paul a member of a secret society that called the Holy Bible 'a hoax,' that was banned for mocking Christianity and Christ?" Conway's campaign asks in a new statewide ad.

Source: National Post coverage of 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 18, 2010

Rand Paul: I'm "a pro-life Christian"; denies worshiping "Aqua Buddha"

Conway's campaign asks in a new statewide ad, "Why did Rand Paul once tie a woman up, tell her to bow down before a false idol & say his god was Aqua Buddha?" The latter claim refers to a charge made in the GQ article by an unnamed college swim teammate, who said Paul and another student also tried to force her to smoke marijuana. The episode reportedly occurred in 1983.

Paul has called the claim "ridiculous" and said he was "never involved with kidnapping." During a Saturday debate, Conway repeated the allegation against Paul--triggering one of the angriest exchanges of the 2010 campaign season. "You know, Jack, you know how we tell when you're lying? It's when your lips are moving. OK?" Paul sputtered. "You're going to stand over there and accuse me of a crime for 30 years ago from some anonymous source?" He added: "Jack, have you no decency? Have you no shame?"

Paul describes himself as a "pro-life Christian" and says his faith is "something very personal to me, my wife, my kids."

Source: National Post coverage of 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 18, 2010

Jack Conway: An honor to run for Wendell Ford's senate seat

Conway, the Democrat, said it was "a tremendous honor to be running for Wendell Ford's senate seat."

Paul replied, "I didn't know it was Wendell Ford's seat. I thought it was the people of Kentucky's seat."

The response mirrored an exchange that occurred in Massachusetts earlier this year, when a debate moderator made a reference to the late Ted Kennedy's senate seat and Scott Brown, the insurgent Republican, shot back: "It's not the Kennedy's seat. It's not the Democrat's seat. It's the people's seat."

"The people's seat" became the rallying cry for Brown, who won the race.

Wendell Ford, a Democrat, holds a Kennedy-like place in the Kentucky political firmament. He represented Kentucky for 24 years in the Senate, also served as the state's governor and was the unofficial head of the state party for three decades until he retired in 1999. Time will tell whether Mr. Conway's reference is perceived as a slip-up.

Source: NY Times coverage of 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 3, 2010

Rand Paul: This election really is about the president's agenda

I think this election really is about the president's agenda. Do you support the president's agenda or do you not support it? I think his agenda's wrong for America. I will stand up against Pres. Obama's agenda. And I think that's what people in Kentucky want.

Q: You say very little about Attorney General Conway on the campaign trail. Now's your chance.

PAUL: He needs to either defend his president or run away. So far he's running away from Pres. Obama and the agenda. He supports Obamacare. He supported repealing the tax cuts before he was against it. Cap and trade, he's been on both sides of the issue.

Source: Fox News Sunday, 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 3, 2010

Rand Paul: This is not Wendell Ford's seat; it's the people's seat

There was a revealing exchange reminiscent of a pivotal moment in the Massachusetts senate race earlier this year. Conway, the Democrat, said it was "a tremendous honor to be running for Wendell Ford's senate seat."

Paul replied, "I didn't know it was Wendell Ford's seat. I thought it was the people of Kentucky's seat."

The response mirrored an exchange that occurred in MA earlier this year, when a debate moderator made a reference to the late Ted Kennedy's senate seat and Scott Brown, the insurgent Republican, shot back: "It's not the Kennedy's seat. It's not the Democrat's seat. It's the people's seat."

"The people's seat" became the rallying cry for Brown, who won the race. The phrase neatly captured the zeitgeist of a year in which insurgent grass-roots candidates across the country have been a forceful presence.

Wendell Ford, a Democrat, holds a Kennedy-like place in the Kentucky political firmament. He represented Kentucky for 24 years in the Senate, & served as the state's governor.

Source: NY Times coverage of 2010 Kentucky Senate debate Oct 3, 2010

Bruce Lunsford: McConnell enables Bush & squandered 24 years in Senate

Lunsford offered the most biting criticism at the end of the forum, when he used his closing remarks to speak directly to McConnell. He told him that he has used his power to block progress rather than help his constituents. “The last 24 years, you’ve ha an opportunity to do great things and great things for the country. and I think you’ve failed,” he said.

He also said McConnell has been an enabler for Pres. Bush, whom he called the worst president since Herbert Hoover. “I think in many ways the syste has been better to you than you have been to the system,“ he said.

McConnell had no chance to respond to those remarks during the program. But he said afterward that Bush’s 8-year tenure has produced both good and bad results, declining to specify the latter. He dismissed Lunsford’s assertion that he, McConnell, had failed. ”That’s hardly a credible argument to be made against one of the two leaders in the US Senate,“ he said. ”I think that’s an argument that people will just simply laugh at.“

Source: 2008 Kentucky Senate debate reported in Courier-Journal Aug 21, 2008

Mitch McConnell: After 24 years, one of the two leaders in the US Senate

Lunsford offered the most biting criticism at the end of the forum, when he used his closing remarks to speak directly to McConnell. He told him that he has used his power to block progress rather than help his constituents. “The last 24 years, you’ve ha an opportunity to do great things and great things for the country. and I think you’ve failed,” he said.

He also said McConnell has been an enabler for Pres. Bush, whom he called the worst president since Herbert Hoover. “I think in many ways the syste has been better to you than you have been to the system,“ he said.

McConnell had no chance to respond to those remarks during the program. But he said afterward that Bush’s 8-year tenure has produced both good and bad results, declining to specify the latter. He dismissed Lunsford’s assertion that he, McConnell, had failed. ”That’s hardly a credible argument to be made against one of the two leaders in the US Senate,“ he said. ”I think that’s an argument that people will just simply laugh at.“

Source: 2008 Kentucky Senate debate reported in Courier-Journal Aug 21, 2008

Mitch McConnell: Leadership has value; freshmen have little impact

McConnell [repeatedly] brought his remarks back to his central campaign theme of touting the value of his leadership position. That, he said, will be lost “if you were to trade in the Republican leader in the Senate for a freshman member of the other party. He won’t be there long enough to have any impact no matter how sharp he thinks he is.”
Source: 2008 Kentucky Senate debate reported in Herald-Leader Aug 21, 2008

  • The above quotations are from Commonwealth of Kentucky Politicians: Archives.
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2020 Presidential contenders on Principles & Values:
  Democrats running for President:
Sen.Michael Bennet (D-CO)
V.P.Joe Biden (D-DE)
Mayor Mike Bloomberg (I-NYC)
Gov.Steve Bullock (D-MT)
Mayor Pete Buttigieg (D-IN)
Sen.Cory Booker (D-NJ)
Secy.Julian Castro (D-TX)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Rep.John Delaney (D-MD)
Rep.Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Sen.Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Gov.Deval Patrick (D-MA)
Sen.Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
CEO Tom Steyer (D-CA)
Sen.Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Marianne Williamson (D-CA)
CEO Andrew Yang (D-NY)

2020 Third Party Candidates:
Rep.Justin Amash (L-MI)
CEO Don Blankenship (C-WV)
Gov.Lincoln Chafee (L-RI)
Howie Hawkins (G-NY)
Gov.Gary Johnson(L-NM)
Howard Schultz(I-WA)
Gov.Jesse Ventura (I-MN)
Republicans running for President:
Sen.Ted Cruz(R-TX)
Gov.Larry Hogan (R-MD)
Gov.John Kasich(R-OH)
V.P.Mike Pence(R-IN)
Gov.Mark Sanford (R-SC)
Pres.Donald Trump(R-NY)
Rep.Joe Walsh (R-IL)
Gov.Bill Weld(R-MA & L-NY)

2020 Withdrawn Democratic Candidates:
Sen.Stacey Abrams (D-GA)
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D-NYC)
Sen.Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)
Sen.Mike Gravel (D-AK)
Sen.Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Gov.John Hickenlooper (D-CO)
Gov.Jay Inslee (D-WA)
Mayor Wayne Messam (D-FL)
Rep.Seth Moulton (D-MA)
Rep.Beto O`Rourke (D-TX)
Rep.Tim Ryan (D-CA)
Adm.Joe Sestak (D-PA)
Rep.Eric Swalwell (D-CA)
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